Please login or register.
Login with username, password and session length

The Nihon Review Forum

October 21, 2017, 07:41:28 PM
News: Check us out on Twitter and Facebook!
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Water and Consumerism  (Read 6466 times)

Offline Tamashii

  • Always Very Prepared
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 392
    • http://www.nihonreview.com

Water and Consumerism
« on: December 03, 2007, 12:58:38 AM »
I am drinking a cup of Poland Spring water and have, once again, been confronted with the issue of my self-legitimizing of my indulgence of Poland Spring, the only 'spring water' I can tolerate. The other water I can tolerate, however, is called tap water.

So here is an ode to tap water!

First you need some precipitation
That leads to accumulation
Condensation,
Evaporation,
That's the water cycle!

First the rain comes down, and the ground gets muddied
But don't you frown, cause it'll be all gone soon
Cause the sun and rain like you may have studied
Are part of a cycle that's in play
When water comes down then dries away
The system is nature's way
Of keeping things in tune

Chorus

When you see a cloud you don't need to hate it
You can be proud you know why that cloud is there!
Little water drops that evaporated
Joined up with their friends then start to fly
Into a big group up in the sky
And after some time goes by
A cloud forms in the air

Chorus

Patter: Clouds (wh-wh-wh-wh-wh-wh-wh-wh-wh)
Sprinkles (tap tap tap tap tap tap tap tap tap)
Rain (rub rub rub rub rub rub rub rub rub)
More rain (sh-sh-sh-sh-sh-sh-sh-sh-sh)
Pouring (slap slap slap slap slap slap slap slap slap)
Evaporation (slur-urp)
Up into the sky!

Chorus


If by now, you do not get where I am going when I mention both "Tap Water" and "Spring Water" and "Consumerism" in the same page, the same sentence, the same sphere of being of breath and existence, then you need to leave!

So if you're a bottle-water drinker, it's time to step it up and be courageous, strong, willing--it's time to just drink tap water. Cause you know what? YOU KNOW WHAT, BITCH? I'm sick of capitalism. I'm sick of being tricked into buying shit. I'm sick of it. I'm sick of greed. And I'm sick of the proliferation of American pseudo-mentalities towards commercialization into other cultures. ****ing sick!
TAKE IT OR LEAVE IT, ASSHOLES

Offline sevenzig

  • Administrator
  • Newbie
  • *****
  • Posts: 1
    • Chat with sevenzig using Skype
    • Steam Community :: sevenzig

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2007, 01:51:44 PM »
I don't pay for something that I can get for free.

Offline AC

  • Screenshot Master
  • Reviewer
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3800
    • ACCESS1986 | Anime-Planet
    • Chat with nazrul.bin.buang using Skype
    • @@AC_CESS
    • The Nihon Review

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2007, 02:54:33 AM »
Frankly, I don't see how bottled water is so much better than tap water. I guess this is important to the countries which are deprived of clean tap water. I trust my country's tap water at least.

Offline Akira

  • Warring with philistines.
  • Ex-Reviewer
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 495

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2007, 03:58:32 PM »
I hate Feyenoord Rotterdam. ~_~

Also, you're flipping a shit over absolutely nothing. So what if we drink bottled water? In fact, I don't drink either. I drink whatever ice melts from inside my fridge and hot tea.

If you can't get over consumerism, go into the corner and cry moar...
I don't have opinions. I have facts.

Offline royal crown

  • Sansui QH-44
  • Ex-Reviewer
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 177

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2007, 06:17:26 PM »
Akira, I would have never expected that from you. Nevertheless, I applaud your efforts - though you'll probably disagree with me (as will most) on this.

I love capitalism. I love consumerism. I absolutely love people spending more money than they need on frivolities. They don't deserve their money; the masterminds behind bottled water deserve their money. Current society whines too much about their own stupidity. They're somehow mad because everyone "tricks" them, like with the fiasco at McDonalds. People yapping left and right because McDonalds is unhealthy. Nobody forced them to eat there, they just continued to whine about how they're fat, and it's all McDonalds fault. Let's not turn over the place mat, let's not READ THE WRAPPER FOR THE NUTRITIONAL FACTS. No, let's just complain the government that McDonalds is being a bully for temping us with their delicious and fattening fries. Try eating less, fatty. Not to mention Liebeck v McDonalds. What ever happened to personal responsibility? The bottled water people didn't trick you; why do you think it's called bottled water? What were you expecting from it? I buy bottled water sometimes when I'm out because I want the bottle, and I reuse it several times - but that doesn't mean I won't actively make fun of the tool that buys bottled water every single time. But capitalism is not to blame for this nonsense - stupidity is. People are just too stupid; I can't emphasize this enough. Too stupid.

Offline C0MPL3X

  • :3
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 423

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2007, 06:55:33 PM »
You can get one of those light steel water bottles which takes care of needing to buy plastic ones in the first place. I heard that reusing plastic ones can leech toxins and chemicals, no idea if that's scientifically proven or not, but it feels weird using the same plastic bottle more than two or three times anyway. Or at least, for me. Besides, steel bottles make your water cooler. Yea, there's the thing about spending money on a bottle which you can get it for free, but hey, money is there to spend if you've got them.

Offline Akira

  • Warring with philistines.
  • Ex-Reviewer
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 495

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2007, 07:45:22 PM »
Quote from: royal crown
Akira, I would have never expected that from you. Nevertheless, I applaud your efforts - though you'll probably disagree with me (as will most) on this.


You know, I don't support capitalism or consumerism at all. I'm just sick and tired of people going and whining about how they have to pay for bottled water to the entire world when there are good comrades like me who just silently drink whatever shit water is kicked down to me without complaints. That's all.
I don't have opinions. I have facts.

Offline Tamashii

  • Always Very Prepared
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 392
    • http://www.nihonreview.com

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2007, 12:53:09 PM »
I think this was around 4AM, dying of insomnia and boredom. Don't take me seriously when I post a picture of a 4-year-old kid giving you the middle finger. I mean, I've got a song, I've got big, bold letters--I guess I gotta rework that humor. Nonetheless, grow out of your shell. :)

However, I am serious about the issues that capitalism arises, such as corruption, materialism, exploitation, unequal distribution of wealth, etc. And in relation to the bottled water issue, yes, no one is forcing you to buy it; however, sometimes you are tricked into buying it. Believe it or not, there are "stupid" people, too. And if you're going to take on an American individualistic mindset of blame-the-victim, then you're submitting to ignorance and not seeing the whole picture. Say, a commercial (and I have seen this) advertises that drinking tap water will increase your chances of getting lead poisoning, so you should buy their water-filtering system and stay safe. Not everyone knows that this is not true. In the competitive market that capitalism encourages, everyone will give it their shot at selling their products--and you've all seen how many ways infomercials can twist things up--basically with no regards to the buyer, meaning this can inflict harm on the buyer without their notice beforehand. And that's just one example of the corruption that capitalism has spawned. Why do we not blame the system instead of blame each other? What is truly more productive? I don't see too many philosophers going, "Hey, you're dumb! Deal with it or get out!" Instead, I'm sure they are criticizing what is really wrong.

Offline royal crown

  • Sansui QH-44
  • Ex-Reviewer
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 177

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2007, 02:17:10 PM »
I really don't see where ignorance comes into play here. Honestly, I've only gotten fooled by an infomercial once, and that was when I was 6 for some stupid mechanical toothbrush. Ever since then, I've never bought into it. If you get tricked by an infomercial, there seriously is nobody but you to blame for that, considering that a 6 1/2 year old would have better judgment than you. Sure not everyone knows that X is not true, but why does that matter? You seem to label this as "corruption," but there's no corruption at all going on here (granted, there's tons of corruption in government period, but that's been seen in basically every government regardless of the economic system used).  This so-called "blame-the-victim" mindset you seem to be criticizing is called responsibility, and inequalities in wealth are a good thing insofar as the poorest people now have much higher purchasing power than they did back when the Gini coefficient was much lower. I still don't see why, as long as there isn't outright fraud, people should not be responsible for the actions they take. As an aside, there were plenty of philosophers who supported capitalism - they're just dead now. I would say that the only reason philosophy is the way it is currently is because the flavor of the month is postmodernism. It's a logical fallacy to say that just because a specific group of people dislike capitalism that capitalism is outright wrong, and the argument becomes even less credible when the statement is only applicable to a small amount of philosophers.

Offline Tamashii

  • Always Very Prepared
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 392
    • http://www.nihonreview.com

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2007, 04:35:45 PM »
Your last statements went off on a tangent because I was making an example of thinkers, not necessarily philosophers, blaming systems not people--nothing to do with capitalism and philosophy being intertwined, whatever.

You see, it's not an issue of ignorance, it's an issue of stupidity. The difference between ignorance and stupid is that the former is "a choice to not understand," (take the word "choice" rather loosely) while the latter is the "inability to understand." There are stupid people, like I have said before. These are generally people, adults, who fall for the traps (I dare not include children, because they've yet grown to the point where one can identify whether they are stupid or ignorant). Intelligent people, such as many of us here on this board, may be ignorant, but never stupid.

It's funny how my anthropology professor had generalized, and it seems apparently true here, that on average, Americans will always have a "blame the victim" mindset. The way you rephrased it as "responsibility" is attestant to this notion. If you're unwilling to see outside of your walls, then I can't help you. Lastly, it is corruption, especially when it succeeds (and succeed very well if I may add). Nothing is wrong with people doing all sorts of nasty things to get ahead? Oh please, you don't need to look at my example, it's rather weak. You can just open your eyes, just a bit, 'cause the evidence is splattered all over the country. Perhaps it's better put to say explicitly that capitalism spawns corruption, as I originally intended.

Offline royal crown

  • Sansui QH-44
  • Ex-Reviewer
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 177

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2007, 06:59:53 PM »
This really isn't a matter of "looking outside one's walls." I've extensively studied several forms of Marxism, socialism, populism... pretty much every -ism there is. I've simply reached a different conclusion than you, and just because I happen to disagree with you certainly does not mean that I'm unwilling to see outside of my own walls. The same thing could be said of you; that you're unwilling to look outside your own walls in assessing the current American system. It's just silly name calling.

When I say "stupid," I mean that if somebody gets tricked once from any given thing, i.e. infomercial, then if they are not stupid they will not continue to get tricked by said infomercial - this applies across everything. I find the alternate system that you're advocating far more dangerous. Take, for instance, cheese. I don't find it very persuasive that cheese should be banned. But at the same time, cheese is high in fat and if one eats too much cheese it's likely one will suffer from obesity. Does that mean we get rid of cheese? Should we limit how much cheese is offered to any given individual? That seems very silly, and if it were to happen in reality I'd find it quite frightening. Let's apply that to bottled water. Surely there are legitimate reasons to purchase bottled water; say you forget to bring a bottle from home and you find yourself thirsty on a road trip. Hell, maybe you just are too lazy to use the water fountain. Does that make you stupid? Probably in the latter situation. But it sure was worth it to him, and if he has lots of money that's perfectly cool. Granted this doesn't apply to advertising exactly, but there is a strong parallel. Take the above example and call cheese healthy. How could something that makes you fat possibly be healthy? Yes it has vitamins and minerals, but at the end of the day there are healthier alternatives to cheese. Despite that, I would find it hard to support the banning of advertising cheese as healthy. In the same way, look at bottled water. To some people, and especially between brands, bottled water really does taste better. Whether this is due to placebo, it doesn't matter, so long as they're feeling good from drinking it that money they paid is worth the endorphins to them. As for health concerns, I've never once seen a major brand of bottled water claim that there are specific health benefits to bottled water, nor that tap water is specifically unhealthy (as for your examples, depending on your area, tap water can increase your chances of lead poisoning. Increase it significantly? Probably not, but that's up to each individual as to whether or not it's worth it). All they usually say is "contains minerals." Drawing the conclusion that those minerals are good for you - THAT'S stupidity. And yeah, in certain cases I consider lacking common sense to be stupid. As for ignorance, the fact that they are adults mean that there are several venues through which they can learn whether or not x product is good or bad. The Internet for one, books for another. There's always a public library available, at least in most countries. Hell, most major universities have their libraries open to the public.

I also don't see how some professor saying that I take a "blame the victim," mindset necessarily makes me wrong. I mean, aside from the blatant negative connotations of the word "victim," I don't see how saying I have that given mentality makes me necessarily wrong. Furthermore, where is there a victim? This person was not coerced into giving their money away, or had their money stolen from there. They willingly gave them their money, and they got something in return. You may think that what they got wasn't worth what they paid, but you can't extend your personal beliefs to everyone. I'm sure that there are actually people who are satisfied with some stupid POS they got via an infomercial.

As for corruption, corruption is (generally) defined as something operating apart from its original intended purpose. As far as consensual transactions go, capitalism isn't operating any differently than from its original conception - people are still free to do as they please with their money. And as I stated earlier, it's government that ends up corrupted. Socialist governments, Marxist governments, fascist governments, capitalist governments, all suffered from corruption. It's definitely not unique to capitalism.

And, as for the philosophy thing, it's still an appeal to the masses (though probably more closely resembles an appeal to authority). Just because a large number of people, or a group of "thinkers," say or do something doesn't mean it's right. Furthermore, when you increase the term and expand it to "thinkers," the list of people supporting capitalism - and thus supporting individual responsibility - becomes even greater; differentiating philosophers doesn't change this reality. There are several intelligent and noteworthy people that support capitalism.

Offline Tamashii

  • Always Very Prepared
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 392
    • http://www.nihonreview.com

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2007, 09:32:08 PM »
Honestly, it is hard to have an argument with you because you generally always misunderstand me. Whether it be intentional, in order to argue a strawman, who knows. I'm just getting a little tired of it. Though I do have a draft to write, I think I can spare some time here...

Whatever you may support, capitalism, whatever, hell, I don't care. What I have a problem with is the general tendency to not look at the system, but instead look at the people. Who's to take the blame for the failings of certain aspects of society--why it's got to be the people. Let's check East Harlem for a second, and wonder why crime is correlated with Puerto Ricans and Blacks (take a look at the jails). Is it really that these people somehow "failed" to reach the 'American Dream,' somehow "failed" maintaining any sense of morality? Or is it the marginalization and mass-migration, the institutionalized racism and culture clash that has forced a great deal of these people to the underground economy of drug trafficking? (Check out Bourgois' In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio if you want to read more on it) My assault of capitalism seemed like a call for Communism, or some other form of economy--wrong. My assault on capitalism is an assault on a system, in defense of the people that system controls (read my posts again; my posts were responses against the anti-person sentimentality).

You are taking my "false advertisement/water bottle" example to some incredible extremes. I don't see what you have written refuted anything I've said. The statement is that capitalism is prone to corruption, where people, in such a competitive market, will use all kinds of ways to attract customers, perhaps even exploit them, to earn money. It's funny how you mention 'ignorance' with 'books', because that's exactly what I meant. I am ignorant of how to build a rocket to the moon. It's not necessarily true that I can't learn it, it's just that I have, somehow, chosen not to learn it by choosing to learn other things. Just because they can learn, does not mean they will. Just because people can learn that the office desk has more bacteria than the toilet seat, doesn't mean they will or want to. Being an adult does not necessarily mean you are bestowed with some responsibility that you must educate yourself--it's just that some people have the capacity to, some don't, and some are unwilling.

I guess scholars that are against "blame the victim" mentalities named it "blame the victim," because they see it as the system that is 'victimizing' people. It makes you wrong in my argument (what I originally argued for, system vs blame the victim) because instead of looking at the system, you took an axe to the people.

I find it hard to buy your corruption argument. Does the word "monopoly" ring a bell? Does "Microsoft" ring a bell? I'm sure that's all fair and "originally intended." I understand that corruption is, basically, everywhere and in everything, whether it be Socialist or Monarchical. Understood well many years ago. But economic systems are not free from blame, because is not the economic system strongly entwined to the governing system?

The "philosophy thing" was an offhand comment, intending to say how intellectuals have analyzed systems and not people. Yes, intelligent and noteworthy people do support capitalism, whoever would think otherwise. I just like it how intelligent and noteworthy people write volumes and volumes on the systems instead of on the people. Logical fallacy? Who cares--not me! My arguments still stand (and so does this "philosophy thing").

Offline Akira

  • Warring with philistines.
  • Ex-Reviewer
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 495

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2007, 10:28:41 PM »
Quote from: Tamashii
I think this was around 4AM, dying of insomnia and boredom. Don't take me seriously when I post a picture of a 4-year-old kid giving you the middle finger. I mean, I've got a song, I've got big, bold letters--I guess I gotta rework that humor. Nonetheless, grow out of your shell. :)

However, I am serious about the issues that capitalism arises, such as corruption, materialism, exploitation, unequal distribution of wealth, etc. And in relation to the bottled water issue, yes, no one is forcing you to buy it; however, sometimes you are tricked into buying it. Believe it or not, there are "stupid" people, too. And if you're going to take on an American individualistic mindset of blame-the-victim, then you're submitting to ignorance and not seeing the whole picture. Say, a commercial (and I have seen this) advertises that drinking tap water will increase your chances of getting lead poisoning, so you should buy their water-filtering system and stay safe. Not everyone knows that this is not true. In the competitive market that capitalism encourages, everyone will give it their shot at selling their products--and you've all seen how many ways infomercials can twist things up--basically with no regards to the buyer, meaning this can inflict harm on the buyer without their notice beforehand. And that's just one example of the corruption that capitalism has spawned. Why do we not blame the system instead of blame each other? What is truly more productive? I don't see too many philosophers going, "Hey, you're dumb! Deal with it or get out!" Instead, I'm sure they are criticizing what is really wrong.


Tama, you'd be suprised how many philosophical bitchfights go on. If you ever pick up a journal on philosophy, you'll notice most of the articles are inadvertently calling each other stupid. That's what academics do. They debate amongst themselves. Most good works of philosophy were born from bitchfights. Why do you think the Enlightenment happened in salons?

Anyway, you were saying? :D
I don't have opinions. I have facts.

Offline blackrose

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 0

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2009, 09:32:31 AM »
Domestic hot water is provided by means of water heater appliances, or through district heating. The hot water from these units is then piped to the various fixtures and appliances that require hot water, such as lavatories, sinks, bathtubs, showers, washing machines, and dishwashers.




_________________
Refrigerator Filters

Offline sevenzig

  • Administrator
  • Newbie
  • *****
  • Posts: 1
    • Chat with sevenzig using Skype
    • Steam Community :: sevenzig

Re: Water and Consumerism
« Reply #14 on: June 07, 2009, 03:32:34 AM »
No one gives a shit anymore.
Pages: [1]   Go Up